Make your contribution to the project, add an article. Find out how

Deep Dish Pizza

From Mycitycuisine.org
Jump to: navigation, search
Deep Dish Pizza1.jpg

Deep Dish Pizza or also known as Chicago-style pizza is pizza style developed in Chicago. This type of pizza has a buttery crust up to three inches tall at the edge, slightly higher than the large amounts of cheese and chunky tomato sauce, acting as a large bowl. While in Chicago most pizzerias serve thin-crust pizza, generally in a style characteristic to the city, the term Chicago-style pizza is used to describe this deep-dish style of pizza.

History:


The Chicago-style "deep-dish" pizza was invented at Pizzeria Uno, in Chicago, in 1943, reportedly by Uno's founder Ike Sewell, a former University of Texas football star. However, a 1956 article from the Chicago Daily News asserts that Uno's original pizza chef Rudy Malnati developed the recipe. This pizza is far from the roots of an original Italian pizza. It does not include thin crusts or delicate toppings, but rather it is made with a heavy, thick crust and large amounts of cheese, sauce and ingredients.

Preparation:


The pizza begins with a thick layer of dough made with olive oil and cornmeal laid into a deep round pan and pulled up by the sides, then parbaked before the toppings are added, to give it greater spring; the pan is oiled heavily in order to create a fried effect on the outside of the crust. The crust is covered with cheese (generally sliced mozzarella) and meat, usually in a solid layer or patty, just above the crust. Italian sausage (a Chicago staple), as well as vegetables such as onions, mushrooms and bell peppers are also used. A sauce, usually uncooked, made from shredded or puréed tomatoes is added.

Chicago is known for others styles of pizzas such as: Stuffed pizza; Pan pizza; Thin-crust pizza.


Photo Gallery

To add a photo, please follow this submit form.



References

Chicago Deep Dish Pizza, video.about.com

Chicago-style pizza, en.wikipedia.org

Chicago Style Italian Sausage and Pepper Deep Dish Pizza, www.foodnetwork.com