Make your contribution to the project, add an article. Find out how

Drambuie

From Mycitycuisine.org
Jump to: navigation, search
Napit.jpg

Drambuie is a honey- and herb-flavoured golden liqueur made from aged malt whisky, heather honey and a secret blend of herbs and spices. The flavour suggests saffron, honey, anise, nutmeg and herbs.

It is produced in Broxburn, West Lothian, Scotland, and can be served "neat" (at room temperature with no ice), on the rocks, or used as an ingredient in a mixed drink, such as the rusty nail cocktail.

The alcohol by volume of Drambuie liqueur is 40% (80 proof).

In 2009, Drambuie launched its single premium cask expression, The Royal Legacy of 1745, a cask-infused 46% alcohol by volume malt whiskey liqueur. The Royal Legacy of 1745 won the Drinks International Travel Retail Award for Best Travel Retail Drinks Launch at the TFWA, Cannes in October 2009.

The name "Drambuie" comes from the Scottish Gaelic phrase an dram buidheach, meaning "the drink that satisfies", or possibly an dram buidhe meaning "the yellow drink".

History


After the Battle of Culloden in 1746, Prince Charles Edward Stuart fled to the island of Skye. There, he was given sanctuary by Captain John MacKinnon of Clan MacKinnon. According to family legend, after staying with the captain, the prince rewarded him with this prized drink recipe. (This version of events is disputed by historians – some believe it to be a story concocted to boost sales of the drink).

The first commercial distribution of Drambuie, in Edinburgh, was in 1910. Only twelve cases were originally sold. In 1916, Drambuie became the first liqueur to be allowed in the cellars of the House of Lords, and Drambuie began to ship world-wide to stationed British soldiers.

Drambuie has generally performed quite well at international spirit ratings competitions. For example, in 2008, it received a "95-100" score (the highest possible) from the Wine Enthusiast rating organization.


Photo Gallery

To add a photo, please follow this submit form.



References

Drambuie, en.wikipedia.org

Welcome to Drambuie, www.drambuie.com

Did You Know? - Drambuie - An Dram Buidheach - The Drink That Satisfies, www.rampantscotland.com