Make your contribution to the project, add an article. Find out how

Muisjes

From Mycitycuisine.org
Jump to: navigation, search
Beschuit met oranje muisjes.jpg

Muisjes (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈmœyʃəs]) are a traditional Dutch open-faced sandwich topping, very similar to nonpareils. While customary on bread, their most typical use is on beschuit, or rusk. Muisjes are made of aniseed sprinkles with a sugared and colored outer layer. Muisjes, meaning "little mice" in Dutch, are named thusly because the anise seed sprinkles are shaped like little mice, with the stem of the anise seed resembling a tail. They are made by one company only, De Ruijter.

Beschuit met muisjes


In the Netherlands, it is a custom at the birth of a baby to eat muisjes on top of rusk--beschuit met muisjes. Mice also stand for fertility. The anise in the muisjes is thought to be good for stimulating lactation and was purported to scare away evil spirits.

As early as the 17th century, the parents of a newly born baby gave away beschuit with a layer of butter and muisjes to the baby's visitors. This tradition continues today. Beschuit with Muisjes are given to the baby's visitors at home, and are brought by older siblings to share at school. Every supermarket in the Netherlands sells boxes of muisjes. "De Ruijter" is currently the only brand in production of muisjes. They have been making them since 1860.

Before the 20th century, visitors to a newborn baby got only white muisjes, then this changed to a mix of pink and white muisjes for both boys and girls. With the introduction of blue muisjes, pink muisjes are now reserved for baby girls only.

Orange muisjes were sold for only one week in December 2003, in honour of the birth of future crown princess Catherina-Amalia. They were also eaten in 1938 at the birth of Queen Beatrix--orange is the color of the Dutch royal family, the House of Orange-Nassau.

Gestampte muisjes


Gestampte muisjes ("crushed muisjes") are muisjes crushed to powder, which are sprinkled onto a slice of bread or a Dutch rusk over butter, a customary breakfast food for Dutch children.


Photo Gallery

To add a photo, please follow this submit form.



References

Muisjes, en.wikipedia.org

A Dutch baby Tradition: “Beschuit met Muisjes”, kiwidutch.wordpress.com

Beschuit met muisjes: The Dutch way of celebrating the arrival of a newborn in the family, www.alwaysfoodie.com