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Scone

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The scone is a small British quick bread (or cake if recipe includes sugar) of Scottish origin. Scones are especially popular in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, but are also eaten in many other countries. They are usually made of wheat, barley or oatmeal, with baking powder as a leavening agent. The scone is a basic component of the cream tea or Devonshire tea.


The original scone was round and flat, usually the size of a medium size plate. It was made with unleavened oats and baked on a griddle (or girdle, in Scots), then cut into triangle-like quadrants for serving. Today, many would call the large round cake a bannock, and call the quadrants scones. In Scotland, the words are often used interchangeably.


When baking powder became available to the masses, scones began to be the oven-baked, well-leavened items we know today. Modern scones are widely available in British bakeries, grocery stores, and supermarkets.

Scones sold commercially are usually round in shape, although some brands are hexagonal as this shape may be tessellated for space-efficiency. When prepared at home, they take various shapes including triangles, rounds and squares.

British scones are often lightly sweetened, but may also be savory. They frequently include raisins, currants, cheese or dates. In Scotland and Ulster, savory varieties of scone include soda scones, also known as soda farls, and potato scones, normally known as tattie scones, which resemble small, thin savory pancakes made with potato flour. Potato scones are most commonly served fried in a full Scottish breakfast.

In some countries one may also encounter savoury varieties of scone which may contain or be topped with combinations of cheese, onion, bacon etc. In the United States, scones are drier, larger and typically sweet.




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References

Scone (bread), en.wikipedia.org

Where did the Term Scone come from, www.kitchenproject.com

History of Scones and Griddle Cakes, www.cakebaker.co.uk